Niche

Streamer categories and understanding what kind of streamer you are

After understanding the purpose behind why you want to live stream and setting your goals, we are getting to the fun part.

What’s the plan? Who are you? Who do you want to be? Yes, more questions, but this is important. Authenticity is how you win. Nobody can be a better version of you then you, and there are some people out there that love what you have to bring forward.

Before we dig into the categories of streamers, please pause and think about what makes you excited about creating content and entertaining others.

Here are a few of the streamer categories that exist today. Please note that many others exist, and above all, know that you can create your own and see if folks like it.

Variety Streamer

  • You are game agnostic. You dabble in everything or at least in more than a few games. When a new game comes out, you are there gaming on day one, especially if the community has hyped it up.
  • To succeed as a variety streamer, it would help if you had a personality or entertainment appeal that transcends the game. People come to watch your take on the game rather than the game itself.
Variety Streamer
Specialist

Specialist

  • You play a specific game. That is your thing. You don’t necessarily need to be a top-ranked player at this game, but this game is your expertise. That is what you do. You enjoy it. You are building a community around it.
  • It would help you succeed if you were top-ranked at this game, but that is not a requirement. You could also provide a lot of entertainment value, thoughtful analysis, or community interaction.
  • It is worth noting that some specialist streamers might find it difficult to transition out of a game that they have found a lot of success in. It is not uncommon for specialist streamers to lose viewers when she/he engages in other content.

Professional

  • You are top-ranked at a particular game. You don’t need to be signed, but you have to be outstanding. Viewers want to see a show of skill. If you are good at a specific game - you can get a reputation for that and grow a community via a sheer display of talent.
Professional
IRL

IRL

  • You don’t mind showing off your life or debating with your community on particular topics. You are the show. This is a large and growing segment where folks are hosting talk shows, dancing, commenting on funny videos, and so much more.
  • To succeed, you must not be shy in front of the camera.

Arts and Crafts

  • You have a skill or hobby of some kind outside of gaming, and you want to share this with the world. This can be coding, painting, cooking, investing, composing music, playing chess or poker, singing. This can be on your computer or not. The main variables are that this is not a video game.
  • To succeed, you should have a hobby/activity that you are passionate about and want to share. Competition in this space is going to be smaller than streaming games, and you might be surprised by the growth. If you have a hobby, we encourage you to take the plunge, run an experiment where you stream that content for four weeks and see what happens.
Arts and Crafts
Talk Show Host

Talk Show Host

  • You run a show or a podcast. You are opinionated, articulate, and you can get guests on the show to discuss different subjects. This is another growing segment.
  • To succeed, you need to have a passion for debate, a point of view on what it means to create an engaging talk show, and ideally a few connections to get an initial set of guests on the show.
  • Note that, in the beginning, this might be tough, especially if you have a small network. Beggars can’t be choosers, and you have to start somewhere. That is okay. Everyone starts somewhere. You will face adverse selection in guests meaning the guests you want are not available, and folks you don’t particularly want will say yes. That is also okay. Keep pushing, think of exciting subjects, do your homework before each show to be informed on the guest(s) and the subject matter.

These are just some of the categories of different streamers. There are many others. And the beauty is that there is at least one viewer out there that will be interested in that content.

Always think about how you can set yourself apart from the crowd. As you continue to experiment with new techniques and gain experience, you will eventually start to develop your own unique style. This will take some time, so be patient.

In fact, most streamers don’t truly find their niche until they’ve been around the scene for a few months. Don’t be discouraged if your viewer base doesn’t seem to be going anywhere in the beginning. Take every stream as an opportunity to learn and grow.

That said, don’t be afraid to change your content and stay true to yourself. It might seem contradictory, but nothing is worse than forcing yourself to stream for money. Not only will you hate doing it, but viewers don’t appreciate streamers who only care about chasing paper.

Regardless of the category you fit in, remember that viewers want to be entertained and be a part of a community. Actively engage with your audience and offer a unique experience. Take advantage of your viewers shared interests to build a loyal following. Make building a community an active priority from day one.